Glenn Gerber

Blogger Profile: Glenn Gerber

Dr. Glenn Gerber is Caribbean Program head for the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. He oversees conservation and recovery efforts for a variety of threatened species and maintains a live-aboard research vessel dedicated to wildlife conservation in the Caribbean. Glenn’s research encompasses a wide range of questions concerning the ecology, behavior, physiology, and genetics of wild populations, all focused on improving conservation efforts. The conservation and recovery programs he oversees involve a diversity of on-the-ground activities including population monitoring, invasive species control, headstarting, translocation, and reintroduction. Glenn has a bachelor of science degree in neurobiology and behavior from Cornell University, an master of science degree in aquatic ecology from the State University of New York, and a doctorate in ecology and evolutionary biology from the University of Tennessee. He serves as co-chair of the IUCN Iguana Specialist Group and is the founder and chair of the Caribbean Wildlife Foundation, an organization dedicated to the preservation of biodiversity in the wider Caribbean region.
Lizards of Guatemala

Lizards of Guatemala

Many iguana species are threatened with extinction due to hunting (apparently they taste like chicken), habitat loss associated with agriculture and development, introduced predators, road kills, and other human-associated threats.   read more

Iguanas: Why Move?

Iguanas: Why Move?

At first glance you may find it difficult to question the value of moving animals like this. Then again, why wouldn’t you move animals out of the bulldozer’s path?   read more

Turks Island Boas

Turks Island Boas

It’s difficult to believe that in an environment dominated by ocean and large sharks, the apex land predator in the Turks and Caicos Islands is a small, nonvenomous snake.   read more

Boas in the Caribbean

Boas in the Caribbean

In mid March, I spent nine days on Big Ambergris Cay in the Turks and Caicos Islands conducting research on the Turks and Caicos rainbow boa Epicrates chrysogaster. Of course,[.....]