Christine Slocomb

Blogger Profile: Christine Slocomb

Christine Slocomb is a senior research technician in the Applied Animal Ecology Division at the San Diego Zoo Institute for Conservation Research. She has a bachelor of arts from the University of California, San Diego, and a master’s degree in biology with an emphasis in behavioral ecology from St. Joseph’s College. For her thesis, she studied chemical communication among captive polar bears. Christine’s Institute projects include captive breeding of San Clemente loggerhead shrikes, behavioral studies with polar and panda bears, native biodiversity monitoring in the Safari Park Reserve, and the translocation of several small mammal species.
The Roo-Rats of Temecula

The Roo-Rats of Temecula

This year, we successfully trapped hundreds of roo-rats, including many reproductive adults and independent young of the year. More than half of these animals were new roo-rats that we tagged during the trapping week.   read more

Endangered Rats and Mice: Unexpected Results

Endangered Rats and Mice: Unexpected Results

I have often wondered why I agreed to study these nocturnal species. At night it is very cold, and it’s hard to find your way in the dark. You work from 5 p.m. to 5 a.m. with no sleep, which is very inconsiderate of our little critters!   read more

No Night-lights for Kangaroo Rats

No Night-lights for Kangaroo Rats

Impact studies have been conducted on sea turtles, bats, and insects, but little research has been done to understand the effects of artificial light on nocturnal ground mammals.   read more

Kangaroo Rats and Pocket Mice Burrow In!

Kangaroo Rats and Pocket Mice Burrow In!

This summer, we conducted our first pocket mouse translocation, the first of a member of the Perognathus family!   read more

Summer Pitfalls: Lots of Lizards!

Summer Pitfalls: Lots of Lizards!

This summer we have seen fewer mammals in our arrays at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park Reserve in Escondido as compared to last spring, whereas the number of herptofauna findings has increased.   read more